DOG LEAD TRAINING – EXTREME CASE – 'DETERMINED DEISEL' – LESSONS ON DOG BEHAVIOR AND TRAINING TIPS



MEET DEISEL – A 6 YEAR OLD STAFFORDSHIRE BULL TERRIER WITH A LEAD OBSESSION.

Andrew Treserden was asked to help as Deisel’s owner couldn’t walk him on a lead.

DEISEL is obsessed with chewing all leads and collars.

Nicknamed DETERMINED DEISEL was very much stuck in a catch 22 situation. He kept attacking the lead everytime he came into contact with it which was stopping his owner from taking him for a walk, which inturn was further increasing his anxiety towards the lead.

THE AIM…
Andrew had to move him past his obsession and take him for a walk to relieve his frustration.

A typical home consultation lasts between 1- 2 hours.
This particular consultation took over 3 hours.

Please do not attempt anything you see in this video without consulting a professional.

Andrew Treserden is a trained dog behaviorist and the techniques used here, come from working with dogs for many years and studying dog and wolf behaviour.

Please subscribe to this channel for more videos☝️😁👌

To book a home consultation with The Dog Translator UK please visit the website for more info:

www.thedogtranslator.co.uk

THANKS FOR WATCHING

source

How to Teach your Puppy to Walk on a Lead



Get more training tips from Serena Dean:
Teaching a puppy to walk on a lead can be very challenging. In this video Serena Dean teaches puppy Moose how to walk nicely on a lead using best behaviour training methods. Serena provides tips and tricks to train puppies that are pulling or weaving on a lead.
Best Behaviour with Serena Dean aims to give you positive training tools so you can develop a strong relationship with your pet, allowing them to become a real part of your family. For more tips from Serena Dean, check out

Serena Dean has over 10 years’ experience within the Veterinary industry in both emergency and general practice. She is the national training and education coordinator at Australia’s largest Veterinary group, Greencross Vets. Serena has trained numerous nurses in animal behaviour and implemented a national animal behaviour program (Best Behaviour) that provides puppy school, juvenile obedience, one-on-one training and client education programs.
Serena holds a Bachelor of Applied Science majoring in Veterinary Technology & Management and Wildlife Biology, Certificate 4 in Veterinary Nursing, Certificate 4 in Training and Assessment and is a professional member of the Society of Veterinary Behaviour Technicians.

source

Dogs establishing rank and dominance, posturing behaviour to avoid conflict



Watch as this German Shepherd and Husky ( both bitches ) establish superiority and deference within a few moments of communication using only low vocals and posturing. Dominance depends on how you interpret it. Using the term dominance as an excuse to use physical punishment in a bid to establish leadership or becoming the pack leader is a complete misunderstanding and misuse of the concept. Dominant dogs project a presence and in most instances do not resort to fighting. Their ritualised displays are understood and accepted by other dogs and generally avoid conflict. Suggesting that the use of physical force towards a dog is interpreted by that dog as you being dominant, or alpha, or the pack leader is absolutely ludicrous. Unless you look like this ^^^, sound like this, move and smell like this – In fact, unless you ARE this ^^^, then your most likely outcome through the use of physical ‘dominance’ is a fearful avoidance/submission caused by confusion in the dog. Jamie penrith take the lead dog training
www.taketheleadtraining.co.uk

source